Where on Google Earth? #215

With a helpful Twitter hint from Ron Schott, I won my second “Where on (Google) Earth?” challenge, the 214th edition of this popular geoblogospheric competition. As a result, I get to host the next one, Where on Google Earth? #215.

The aim of the game is to figure out where on Earth this satellite imagery comes from, and then post the coordinates (lat/long, UTM, whatever) and give a brief explanation of the geologic significance of the region. (I’ve got a full post ready to go that goes into more detail on the region; so you need only sketch out the flimsiest of details.)

Post your answer in the comments section once you’ve figured it out. The winner earns the right to host Where on Google Earth #216. If you don’t have a blog of your own, then I’ll be happy to host it here on your behalf. I invoke the Schott Rule, which says that you have to wait one hour for each past Wo(G)E that you’ve won before answering. Posting time is 9:00am on Saturday, October 16.

Here it is:

Please note that north is off to the upper right. You can enlarge the screenshot to full-size by clicking through twice. Good luck!

What does Callan see here?

leaves_puzzle

Tell me why I took this iPhone picture, and I’ll mail you a GEOLOGY ROCKS bumper sticker! Answer in the comments below…

Where on Google Earth? #199

For the first time ever, I have won a Where on Google Earth? that Ron Schott hosted, heavy on the clues.

Now that it’s my turn to host, I’d like to spice things up a bit with a dynamic view. Using Google Earth’s historical imagery feature (the little “clock” button up top), I managed to see this suite of very different views of the exact same spot over time:

Click through twice for full-sized versions. Note in particular how much this scene changes between photos #2 and #3, only three days apart! This must be a very dynamic place indeed. You have already noted of course the one constant in these images, down there in the southeastern corner.

No Schott Rule on this one… have fun! To play the game, find the location and leave its latitude and longitude in the comments of this blog post, as well as an explanation of the geological significance of this location.

Remember that this is #199, which means that the winner of this episode of Where On Google Earth? gets the honor of hosting the 200th episode. “200,” like “30,” is a nice round numberhint, hint.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.